Sodaro's Stories

July 17, 2011

Clicking send

Filed under: Writer's thoughts — michelle sodaro @ 2:05 pm

So, they fixed my book…she’s perfect…out of “surgery” and looking just more beautiful than I have ever seen her look. I got through the editing process fairly well, I think…only one breakdown and that was because evidently the software used had complications with the amount of bold used in the book…so lesson learned and I will not format future books in that manner.
Today, I will click on the approved button for the interior of my book…the cover has “general fiction” written twice on it, which I could of course live with except it would bug me when my book was an actual book…which will happen in the next few weeks! This has been an exciting and informative journey, and I know more about what my future novels and poetry books (and other projects) will need in order to expedite the process. For example, if I have future books that need to switch narrators, I will find a way to do so without using excess bold. I also know that with each book receiving its own ISBN (UPC code) that I will have the same “12-year-old in a mall” reaction, so if you are near me when I see it…cover your ears and squeal with me.
In the next few weeks, I have a lot to do…while my first novel goes off to the PRINTING stage…yes, you read that right…and yes, I have been squealing quite a bit about that word…but I have help…amazing amazing help and a support system that continues to blow me out of the water. I am, as always, most certainly undeserving of the love that is given to me!!!

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2 Comments »


  1. I find it easiest to read when authors switch narrators with chapters. If there are chapter titles, they are related to the separate narrators. Personally I find it annoying trying to read large chunks of italics, like when characters are reading text or something like that.

    Comment by Sarah — July 17, 2011 @ 2:38 pm | Reply

    • you are perfectly right and with most novels, I use chapters as a natural switch between narrators. The difficulty with Whatever you Make of It was that the main characters, Johnathon and Rebecca, interact with characters in a book they are reading, so I had to use bold to distinguish between the “real world” of Johnathon and Rebecca and the fictional world of Jac and Jyn.

      Comment by michelle sodaro — July 17, 2011 @ 2:42 pm | Reply


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